MENTALMental, practice et parcours

Des défaillances au niveau mental?

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manhattan
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Mental, practice et parcours

Message par manhattan » 27 déc. 2015, 14:05

Hello,

un membre de GWRX a eu l'opportunité de rencontrer Bob Rotella.
Voici les quelques idées qu'il a retenu, je les met car j'adore la 7 (pricy)
In english of course, mais à retenir routine, routine, routine, confiance et travail.

Man

So i'm going to focus on the general idea's from the meeting and keep it simple and to the point.

So the thing we focused on the most was believing in yourself.

1. Most players go into a match or tourney thinking about which players in the field are better then them which means your believing in others more then yourself. A point he made was you have to believe in your ability because no one else will. If you go into a match believing in others more then yourself you might as well skip the golf and head to the bar. This is something he works on constantly with PGA Tour players especially guts that settle into the "journeymen" mindset. Also a lot of college players get asigned "the number 4 guy" and adopt that mindset. He works to get them to think "'im the #1 guy on his way to the top".

2. Atitude on the golf course. Another common mistake most make is let their atititude become dependent on the outcomes/scores on the card. This is why guys on tour bogey a hole and bounce right back with a birdie. Most players he works with base success on things that have nothing to do with score. For example if you follow your routine to a "T" and make a great stroke on the ball and just miss the putt on the left edge then you have achieved success. With golf there are variables beyond your control and if you follow your game plan, routine, and make a good read then by all means you have achieved success. Whether the putt goes in is just icing on the cake or a bonus. Again a lot of players make a few bogeys or doubles and their day is ruined, this can't happen in order to be successful.

3. Routine, routine, routine. Build a fast and efficient routine. He said most AM's have no idea and do something different almost every shot. A good thing to do is create a routine and then work hard on it. Even video yourself doing it. If you can consistently accomplish this you will play better and gain confidence. Remember #2. If you go through your routine exactly how you practiced, pick your club and make a good swing then you have SUCCESS for that shot before the ball ever lands. Where it lands should not determine success. Obviously we want it to land next to the pin but remember this is about keeping a positive mental outlook and building on many successes during a round.

4. Another big thing he notices with amateurs is how long they stand at address once they put the club behind the ball. He recommended that as soon as the club is set behind the ball you just go. The more time you sit there in that position the worse the shot will be. Try to take advantage of being unconcious for the swing. He said every player whether they realize it or not has a trigger. It might be a waggle, knee kick, or whatever but every player has something they do more often then not that means go. Again this is something you should practice and get down like clock work. Figure out what your trigger is then work hard to initiate it quickly. I think he said the average player takes 2-5 seconds over the ball which is a death sentence.

5. On the green you should have a ROCK SOLID routine. Again once the read is done and speed is figured out you need to jump into your routine and have your trigger set. Get over the ball and let it go. Success is then based on the following
1. Did i feel good about the read match with speed
2. Did i execute my routine
3. Did i freely release my putter through the ball

If you did those 3 things the putt was an aboslute success. Whether it goes in or not, doesn't matter. Control is out of your hands once it leave the putter face. He said sometimes good putts just don't go in for all sorts of reasons and you have to be ok with that. Especially on the green where the ball is on the ground the entire time.

6. Last thing I'll touch on is ball striking and how to practice. This is where he pulled out some stats from the tour and guys he works with. He said the average tour player whether he wins the tourney or not averages around 12 greens in a round. He then said the average scratch player averages around the same so what gives. Ball striking is not a ton better between good AM's and pro's (by good am's he was referring to D1 players in this case and or scratch to + players). The biggest difference is when you look at the scoring clubs. From 130yds out the professional is going to drop it 10-12ft and in while the better amateur is going to be closer to 20ft and in. From there when you look at the odds of making a putt from 10ft vs 15-20ft the difference is astronomical. The other difference is a pro's ability to scramble which is significantly better then a better AM. Around the greens and out of bunkers the pga players will eat you alive.

So if you want to find out how good you really are in the scoring zone he said go play a round of golf and on each tee shot go ahead and hit. When you get to your ball pick it up and take it 30-50 yds toward the hole then drop it. Play every hole like that (obviously not the par 3's) and see if you score any different.

7. So practice:

He recommends not bothering to hit a driver on the range other then to loosen up. He recommends practicing with the driver ON COURSE. He said find the tightest hole on the course with OB or a hazard both left and right then pull out a brand new box of ProV1's and have at it. I found this hilarious. He said there's no better way then to have money on the line and no room to go but straight. Makes sense and again we all know there's nothing worse then loosing brand new $45/dozen balls.

For practice (again he was talking to a college team) you should spend 1hr on scoring clubs, 2hrs on pitching/bunker play, 20 minutes on putting (your actual speed and stroke), and 20 minutes on all other clubs.
Titleist TS2 9°5 Tenseï Blue AV 65R
Titleist 913 FD 15° S+ 82 S
Tileist 915F 18° Rogue Black 80 S
Titleist 913H 19°75 D+ 90S
Titleist 818 H1 23° Tenseï White 90S
4-PW Titleist 716 CB Recoil 110 F4
SM5 52-12-F
SM5 58-11-K
SC Futura X5 34"
Vice Pro Red

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pat_1100
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Message par pat_1100 » 27 déc. 2015, 18:40

Merci man :wink:

toujours sympa de lire le grand Bob !
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Message par Doktorr » 27 déc. 2015, 18:42

Clairement priceless !! Merci Man ! (et ouais, je vais penser à m'entrainer du driver sur le 3 de St Germain les Corbeils à coup de boite de balles à 52€ :lol: )

Perso je sais que ma lacune n°1, c'est justement l'absence de routine... j'ai jamais vraiment bosser pour en établir une, je l’exécute à +/- 10% de conviction et donc en gros, j'ai l'impression que ca me sert à rien en l'état et du coup sur la fin d'un 18, je ne l’exécute même plus... et je sais que je vais finir par vendanger ma carte et ca, j'y arrive bien ! :mrgreen:

Bref, c'est un des points de mon hiver d'entrainement... faut absolument que j'arrive à m'en construire une et à l'implanter dans mon cerveau reptilien ! Plus facile à dire qu'à faire :wink:
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Titleist Bois 4 TS2 16,5° (HZRDUS Smoke Black 70 6.0)
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Callaway APEX UT 21° (Even Flow Black 85 6.0)
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Message par manhattan » 27 déc. 2015, 19:55

Hello,

il y a 3 ans lorsque j'étais dans ma phase confiance/progression, je jouais le driver à peu prêt partout, notamment sur le 1 de mon petit neuf trous, 285 m HL à gauche (pour un gaucher, c'est chaud), bois bien dense à droite, fairway de 25 m au plus large. En général sur la piste ou pas loin et petite approche à faire.
Après j'ai joué stratégique, fer 4 placé, plein wedge et ainsi de suite sur les autres trous.
Je ne joue donc mon driver que sur les 18 trous en compétition avec grosse pression, pas d'entrainement, pas de confiance.

J'avais déjà prévu de recommencer à jouer le driver en entrainement le plus souvent possible, ce point 7 renforce mon idée.
Donc direction D4 pour acheter 2 boites de 12 Inesis 100 à 6 € (je ne vais quand même pas perdre des Z Star non plus :lol: )

Il faut que la confiance revienne avec le driver pour que les 716 brillent un peu sur les cartes de score :wink:

Man
Titleist TS2 9°5 Tenseï Blue AV 65R
Titleist 913 FD 15° S+ 82 S
Tileist 915F 18° Rogue Black 80 S
Titleist 913H 19°75 D+ 90S
Titleist 818 H1 23° Tenseï White 90S
4-PW Titleist 716 CB Recoil 110 F4
SM5 52-12-F
SM5 58-11-K
SC Futura X5 34"
Vice Pro Red

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Message par pat_1100 » 27 déc. 2015, 20:09

Non Man ! pour Bob ce sont des V 1 sinon rien! :wink: :lol:
M2 ADTP 6s
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Honma TW 717 19 et 22 UT 850
Honma TW 737 V DGSL S 300
SM6 52 et 58 DG Spiner
Spider DJ Black

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Message par Nostressleia » 27 déc. 2015, 20:15

pat_1100 a écrit :Non Man ! pour Bob ce sont des V 1 sinon rien! :wink: :lol:
Pitain le budget pour jouer le driver, je vais rester au fer 7 :mrgreen:
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manhattan
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Message par manhattan » 27 déc. 2015, 21:28

pat_1100 a écrit :Non Man ! pour Bob ce sont des V 1 sinon rien! :wink: :lol:
Pour prendre une métaphore d'opportunité, il faut d'abord être un jeune padawan avant de devenir un grand Jedi, les Pro V1 attendront le réveil de la force :lol:

Man
Titleist TS2 9°5 Tenseï Blue AV 65R
Titleist 913 FD 15° S+ 82 S
Tileist 915F 18° Rogue Black 80 S
Titleist 913H 19°75 D+ 90S
Titleist 818 H1 23° Tenseï White 90S
4-PW Titleist 716 CB Recoil 110 F4
SM5 52-12-F
SM5 58-11-K
SC Futura X5 34"
Vice Pro Red

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Message par Tux » 05 janv. 2016, 16:59

Très sympa tout ça !!

Plus ça va, indépendamment du driver, mon practice est sur le terrain. Je fais soit un scramble tout seul et je prends soit la plus mauvaise soit la meilleur. Ou alors, j'en joue une, et je déplace la balle dans un lie moins bon ou dans une situation que je veux travailler.

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Message par ALP » 15 oct. 2016, 10:27

manhattan a écrit :Hello,

un membre de GWRX a eu l'opportunité de rencontrer Bob Rotella.
Voici les quelques idées qu'il a retenu, je les met car j'adore la 7 (pricy)
In english of course, mais à retenir routine, routine, routine, confiance et travail.

Man

So i'm going to focus on the general idea's from the meeting and keep it simple and to the point.

So the thing we focused on the most was believing in yourself.

1. Most players go into a match or tourney thinking about which players in the field are better then them which means your believing in others more then yourself. A point he made was you have to believe in your ability because no one else will. If you go into a match believing in others more then yourself you might as well skip the golf and head to the bar. This is something he works on constantly with PGA Tour players especially guts that settle into the "journeymen" mindset. Also a lot of college players get asigned "the number 4 guy" and adopt that mindset. He works to get them to think "'im the #1 guy on his way to the top".

2. Atitude on the golf course. Another common mistake most make is let their atititude become dependent on the outcomes/scores on the card. This is why guys on tour bogey a hole and bounce right back with a birdie. Most players he works with base success on things that have nothing to do with score. For example if you follow your routine to a "T" and make a great stroke on the ball and just miss the putt on the left edge then you have achieved success. With golf there are variables beyond your control and if you follow your game plan, routine, and make a good read then by all means you have achieved success. Whether the putt goes in is just icing on the cake or a bonus. Again a lot of players make a few bogeys or doubles and their day is ruined, this can't happen in order to be successful.

3. Routine, routine, routine. Build a fast and efficient routine. He said most AM's have no idea and do something different almost every shot. A good thing to do is create a routine and then work hard on it. Even video yourself doing it. If you can consistently accomplish this you will play better and gain confidence. Remember #2. If you go through your routine exactly how you practiced, pick your club and make a good swing then you have SUCCESS for that shot before the ball ever lands. Where it lands should not determine success. Obviously we want it to land next to the pin but remember this is about keeping a positive mental outlook and building on many successes during a round.

4. Another big thing he notices with amateurs is how long they stand at address once they put the club behind the ball. He recommended that as soon as the club is set behind the ball you just go. The more time you sit there in that position the worse the shot will be. Try to take advantage of being unconcious for the swing. He said every player whether they realize it or not has a trigger. It might be a waggle, knee kick, or whatever but every player has something they do more often then not that means go. Again this is something you should practice and get down like clock work. Figure out what your trigger is then work hard to initiate it quickly. I think he said the average player takes 2-5 seconds over the ball which is a death sentence.

5. On the green you should have a ROCK SOLID routine. Again once the read is done and speed is figured out you need to jump into your routine and have your trigger set. Get over the ball and let it go. Success is then based on the following
1. Did i feel good about the read match with speed
2. Did i execute my routine
3. Did i freely release my putter through the ball

If you did those 3 things the putt was an aboslute success. Whether it goes in or not, doesn't matter. Control is out of your hands once it leave the putter face. He said sometimes good putts just don't go in for all sorts of reasons and you have to be ok with that. Especially on the green where the ball is on the ground the entire time.

6. Last thing I'll touch on is ball striking and how to practice. This is where he pulled out some stats from the tour and guys he works with. He said the average tour player whether he wins the tourney or not averages around 12 greens in a round. He then said the average scratch player averages around the same so what gives. Ball striking is not a ton better between good AM's and pro's (by good am's he was referring to D1 players in this case and or scratch to + players). The biggest difference is when you look at the scoring clubs. From 130yds out the professional is going to drop it 10-12ft and in while the better amateur is going to be closer to 20ft and in. From there when you look at the odds of making a putt from 10ft vs 15-20ft the difference is astronomical. The other difference is a pro's ability to scramble which is significantly better then a better AM. Around the greens and out of bunkers the pga players will eat you alive.

So if you want to find out how good you really are in the scoring zone he said go play a round of golf and on each tee shot go ahead and hit. When you get to your ball pick it up and take it 30-50 yds toward the hole then drop it. Play every hole like that (obviously not the par 3's) and see if you score any different.

7. So practice:

He recommends not bothering to hit a driver on the range other then to loosen up. He recommends practicing with the driver ON COURSE. He said find the tightest hole on the course with OB or a hazard both left and right then pull out a brand new box of ProV1's and have at it. I found this hilarious. He said there's no better way then to have money on the line and no room to go but straight. Makes sense and again we all know there's nothing worse then loosing brand new $45/dozen balls.

For practice (again he was talking to a college team) you should spend 1hr on scoring clubs, 2hrs on pitching/bunker play, 20 minutes on putting (your actual speed and stroke), and 20 minutes on all other clubs.
En somme , le swing n'est-il pas un geste inconscient constitué par l'agrégation de constructions conscientes :?:

8 )

Alain :D
....Ce n'est pas la volonté qui même au but , mais le but qui donne la volonté.....

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